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In conjunction with our policies, we work hand in hand with Diabetes Foundations in Nigeria, we also organise seminar on regularly basis to educate Diabetes Carriers, we enlightened, treat and managed diabetes cases for general well-being and healthy life with our Herbal Product.

We shall post the venue in due course, please check back or call 08023120010.. Read all»

 

  • Weight Management

    Image 01It is proven that if you've got diabetes, losing weight can get you off insulin and other medications. Create a safe diabetes weight loss plan with the help of experts.

    Diabetes Management:

    Regular exercise is an important part of  long term management of diabetes. Since peripheral neuropathy often has serious effects on muscle mass and control in the arms and legs, muscle-building exercises can be an important way of managing some of the physical effects of diabetes. Developing an effective weight training routine you can do easily in your own home may make this part of your diabetes management easier than committing to going to a gym regularly.
    The onset of type 2 diabetes is strongly correlated with overweight. In some cases, if type 2 diabetes is diagnosed early enough, and it is a mild enough case, proper diet combined with regular exercise may lead to the disappearance of diabetic symptoms. While there is a very strong chance the diabetes will return later in life, adding a few more years of good health will certainly help minimize side effects later in life, and will be good 'training' for proper diabetes management when it becomes necessary again. While exercise can never 'cure' type 1 diabetes it is still an important part of diabetes management.

    There's no question about it: If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, dropping pounds lowers your blood sugar, improves your health, and helps you feel better

    But before you start a diabetes weight loss plan, it's important to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator - because while you're dieting, your blood sugar, insulin, and medications need special attention

    A National Institutes of Health study found that a combination of diet and exercise cuts the risk of developing diabetes by 58%. The study involved people who were overweight (average body mass index of 34) and who had high -- but not yet diabetic -- blood sugar levels.

    "We know it's true -- that if someone with diabetes loses 5% to 10% of their weight, they will significantly reduce their blood sugar,"

    Even losing 10 or 15 pounds has health benefits, says the American Diabetes Association. It can:

    • Lower blood sugar
    • Reduce blood pressure
    • Improve cholesterol levels
    • Lighten the stress on hips, knees, ankles, and feet

    Plus, you'll probably have more energy, get around easier, and breathe easier.

    You are at an increased risk of developing diabetes if you are:

    • A woman with a waist circumference of 35 inches or more
    • A man with a waist circumference of 40 inches or more

    Warning

    "Don't try to lose weight on your own. "With a doctor and a good nutritionist, it's very safe to do. This is very Image 01important if you're taking medications."

    Most people with diabetes have learned that what they choose to eat and drink can help raise or lower their blood sugar levels after meals. So which foods should you choose if you have diabetes?

    What you need to know about diabetes and diet

    Eating right is vital if you’re trying to prevent or control diabetes. While exercise is also important, what you eat has the biggest impact when it comes to weight loss. But what does eating right for diabetes mean? You may be surprised to hear that your nutritional needs are virtually the same everyone else: no special foods or complicated diets are necessary.

    A diabetes diet is simply a healthy eating plan that is high in nutrients, low in fat, and moderate in calories. It is a healthy diet for anyone! The only difference is that you need to pay more attention to some of your food choices—most notably the carbohydrates you eat.

    Carbohydrates have a big impact on your blood sugar levels—more so than fats and proteins—but you don’t have to avoid them. You just need to be smart about what types of carbs you eat.

    In general, it’s best to limit highly refined carbohydrates like white bread, pasta, and rice, as well as soda, candy, and snack foods. Focus instead on high-fiber complex carbohydrates—also known as slow-release carbs. Slow-release carbs help keep blood sugar levels even because they are digested more slowly, thus preventing your body from producing too much insulin. They also provide lasting energy and help you stay full longer.

    8 principles of low-glycemic eating

    1. Eat a lot of non-starchy vegetables, beans, and fruits such as apples, pears, peaches, and berries. Even tropical fruits like bananas, mangoes, and papayas tend to have a lower glycemic index than typical desserts.
    2. Eat grains in the least-processed state possible: “unbroken,” such as whole-kernel bread, brown rice, and whole barley, millet, and wheat berries; or traditionally processed, such as stone-ground bread, steel-cut oats, and natural granola or muesli breakfast cereals.
    3. Limit white potatoes and refined grain products such as white breads and white pasta to small side dishes.
    4. Limit concentrated sweets—including high-calorie foods with a low glycemic index, such as ice cream— to occasional treats. Reduce fruit juice to no more than one cup a day. Completely eliminate sugar-sweetened drinks.
    5. Eat a healthful type of protein at most meals, such as beans, fish, or skinless chicken.
    6. Choose foods with healthful fats, such as olive oil, nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans), and avocados. Limit saturated fats from dairy and other animal products. Completely eliminate partially hydrogenated fats (trans fats), which are in fast food and many packaged foods.
    7. Have three meals and one or two snacks each day, and don’t skip breakfast.
    8. Eat slowly and stop when full.

     

    The history of herbal medicine is as old as human civilization, thousands of plant species growing throughout the world have medicinal uses containing active constituents that have direct action in the body. They are used both in herbal and conventional medicine.